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HomeFront PageChildren affected by Typhoon Rai/Odette face uncertain New Year

Children affected by Typhoon Rai/Odette face uncertain New Year

Statement attributable to Ms. Oyunsaikhan Dendevnorov, UNICEF Philippines Representative

As Filipino families gather this New Year’s Eve to welcome 2022, there are 846,000 children who need help after Typhoon Rai/Odette destroyed their homes. A more infectious strain of COVID-19 and continued heavy rainfall over typhoon-affected areas pose an additional danger and can further slow down aid efforts.

Working with the Philippine Government, our UNICEF assessment teams from Surigao del Norte, Siargao Island, Dinagat Island, Southern Leyte, Cebu and Bohol reported that children need safe drinking water, health, nutrition and psychosocial support, protection from violence and continuation of learning.

(top) Ysabella Coyno, 3, sits in the lap of her mother Marie Ann Barrientos, 29, moments after she woke up in the building they relocated to after losing their house December 21, 2021 in Poblacion Barangay in Ubay, Bohol, Philippines. The impact in the area near the shore was immense. Almost all of the shore houses were fully destroyed, a few were partially destroyed. As a result, so far 45 families have relocated to the ‘Ubay Central’ – a mall under construction. PHOTO BY DAVID HOGSHOLT

We saw children with diarrhea in homes and hospitals, their worried parents barely recovering from the shock of losing their homes and livelihoods. Children’s schools were partially or completely destroyed and their learning modules have been inundated. Staying in crowded rooms in evacuation centres with adults exposes them to abuse and exploitation. Local government officials are overwhelmed and child workers such as teachers and social workers are themselves affected.

UNICEF sent life-saving supplies such as water purification tablets, hygiene kits, jerrycans, tents and water storage units, but this initial delivery is far from enough. We are working hard to raise US$11 million to reach 200,000 of the most affected children but have secured only $3.8 million to date. Without this funding, we will miss out on this critical period to respond to children’s needs.

Janielle Galo sits in a make shift shelter after her family lost their house December 20, 2021 in Barangay Tapon, Purok 6 in Ubay, Bohol, Philippines. CONSENT BY MOTHER DORINA BOYLES, 30-y-o. The impact in this area was immense. Almost all of the houses in this purok were fully destroyed, a few were partially destroyed and almost all of the fishing bancas were lost. Many villagers thought they could brave the winds, but a sudden 6 feet surge wave came tumbling in and houses that had so far withstood the onslaught of the typhoon were demolished within mere minutes. PHOTO BY DAVID HOGSHOLT

Some of the affected areas already had worrying rates of malnutrition even before the typhoon struck. We cannot leave these children behind.

As we greet the New Year, we at UNICEF are hopeful that our collective efforts will help children survive and recover. We continue to work closely with the Philippine Government, the UN country team, and our partners to support the Government-led emergency response. We are seeing the tremendous solidarity among organizations and individuals who are contributing to the response in their own way.

The COVID-19 pandemic, compounded by disasters such as Typhoon Odette, is a children’s crisis that we need to end now. Let’s reimagine a better future for all our children as we welcome 2022. Help children and families affected by Typhoon Odette by donating now at https://donate.unicef.ph/campaign/children-emergencies.

After Typhoon Odette (international name Rai) brought widespread destruction to the Philippines on 16 December, the needs of children and families in affected areas are becoming clear. Based on initial assessments, around 845,000 children need urgent assistance. Immediate needs include food, water, medicines, clothing, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), cooking equipment, family kits with sleeping materials, hygiene kits, temporary shelter, disaster kits, tents for healthcare facilities and go bags. UNICEF staff is on the ground conducting assessments and is leading the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), Nutrition, Education and Child Protection clusters together with the Philippine Government and partners. UNICEF’s emergency supplies are ready to be dispatched to respond to people’s needs for safe drinking water, sanitation, hygiene, nutrition, education, and child protection. Around 2,000 family hygiene and dignity kits, 2,767 packs of water purification tablets, additional 2,018 bottles (in 100ml) of household water disinfectants, 2 collapsible bulk water storages, 50 emergency latrine kits and 25 tents for district hospitals and Rural Health Units were dispatched from UNICEF’s Mindanao Field Office in Cotabato City to Dinagat Islands, Siargao, Surigao City and Surigao del Norte. The kits contain items such as water buckets, soaps, toothpaste and sanitary napkins. Photographer: Ernesto Casiple After Typhoon Odette (international name Rai) brought widespread destruction to the Philippines on 16 December, the needs of children and families in affected areas are becoming clear. Based on initial assessments, around 845,000 children need urgent assistance. Immediate needs include food, water, medicines, clothing, Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), cooking equipment, family kits with sleeping materials, hygiene kits, temporary shelter, disaster kits, tents for healthcare facilities and go bags. UNICEF staff is on the ground conducting assessm

For more information, please contact

Niko Wieland     | Chief of Communication    | +63 917 867 8366 | nmwieland@unicef.org

Marge Francia | Communication Officer        | +63 917 858 9447 | mfrancia@unicef.org

About UNICEF

UNICEF works in some of the world’s toughest places, to reach the world’s most disadvantaged children. In more than 190 countries and territories, we work for every child, everywhere, to build a better world for everyone.

For more information about UNICEF and its work for children in the Philippines, visit www.unicef.ph. Follow UNICEF Philippines on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Joel Escolhttps://www.youtube.com/channel/UCK_sKdGFs0ewIh9R-iAskDg
Joel Calamba Escol is a journalist in the Philippines for more than 20 years. Currently, he is the Managing Editor of Mindanao Daily News, the biggest and most-widely read newspaper in Southern Philippines. He is also known as Noypi Vlogger in Youtube. You can follow him on the following social networking sites below.
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