davao

Duterte on teacher’s pay hike: “this year”

October 7, 2019

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews /07 Oct) -– President Rodrigo Duterte on Sunday vowed to increase the salaries of public school teachers “this year” but unlike the military and police, it will not be double their current pay.  “There --- it’s coming ang increases nila. But hindi double. But mas marami ang teachers (there are more teachers), my God. Pero nandiyan po, dadating ‘yan this year (But it’s already there, it will come this year),” he said in answer to a query during a press conference upon his arrival at the Davao International Airport here from his five-day visit to Russia. Duterte said the salary adjustments of the teachers  of the public school teachers might not be double but added it would likely be around 35%. The President declined to give a timeline for the salary adjustment because  “if I give you the timeline tapos I could not make it on the deadline, I have to explain more than what is expected of government.” “Mas mabuti’t na lang ‘yan kung nandiyan na, sinasabi ko nandiyan na ‘yan. Basta sinabi ko may increase din sila. (It’s good that it’s already lined up, I am telling you it’s already there. I said they would also have the salary increase). That I am very sure of,” Duterte said. (Antonio L. Colina IV / MindaNews)

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Japanese firm to build biomass power project in Butuan

October 6, 2019

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 06 October) – A Japanese firm engaged in the construction of bridges and renewable energy projects has partnered with the City Government of Butuan to construct a 2.5-megawatt biomass energy facility that will turn rice husks into fuel this year. In an interview on Sunday, the 3rd day of the 100th year anniversary celebration of the Davao Japanese Community held at the SM Lanang Premier, Chodai Philippines Corporation vice president Toshimichi Hosoya said the company is just waiting for the approval of the government to commence the construction of the renewable energy facility, one of its major projects in Mindanao. He said rice husks could be a good source of biomass for Mindanao since the island has several hectares of rice farms that produce throwaway rice husks, sufficient enough to run the turbines of the biomass facility that produces power. He said the company estimates the project, considered as one of the major renewable energy projects of Chodai in partnership with a local government in Mindanao, would be completed in one year. “Mindanao has a lot of rice farms. That’s why we can get the rice husk easy. It has so much potential for renewable energy projects -- a lot of potential. We know the rice husk project before it’s just garbage but we are trying to make that into fuel. That is a biomass project,” he said. Biomass energy projects are common in Japan as the country, known in the world for its clean environment, is trying to further cut carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, which are “costly” and “not good for the environment,” he said. Mindanao has a huge potential for renewable energy projects, among them hydro energy projects, because of its rich natural resources, according to Hosoya. He said Chodai had already completed three hydropower projects – the two-unit eight-MW Asiga River Small Hydropower Project and four-MW Taguibo Small Hydropower Project in Agusan de Norte, and 23-MW Wawa River Small Hydropower Project in Agusan del Sur. Chodai was one of the Japanese firms that participated in the three-day Davao Japanese Community's 100th Anniversary Business Seminar held Wednesday to Firday at the Marco Polo hotel, to look for possible business ventures in the city. April Marie Dayap, head of the Davao City Investment and Promotion Center (DCIPC), said participants were mostly interested in manufacturing, agri-tourism and environment-related projects. "Among those investors who expressed their interest in the city are those in the manufacturing industry, agri-tourism, waste composting companies, and tourism. We further want to bring them here and hopefully develop investment here," she said. Dayap said the event was a big opportunity for the city to expand its foreign investment portfolio and generate more employment for Dabawenyos. Japanese Consul General Yoshiaki Miwa said manufacturing will be the next big thing in Davao City, especially that several Japanese manufacturing firms are interested to venture in the city. "Manufacturing industry has a very wide range. We can start at a level that will match the level of industry in the city. We just have to create a strategy. I understand that the DCIPC and DCCCII know about this and are thinking about ways to accommodate the manufacturing sector," he said.  (Antonio L. Colina IV / MindaNews)

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Duterte to consult Cabinet on nuclear agreement with Russia

October 6, 2019

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 06 October) – President Rodrigo Duterte will consult members of his Cabinet concerning the agreement that the Philippines signed with Russia to explore the possibility of constructing nuclear power plants here. Duterte told reporters in a press conference shortly after his arrival from a five-day official visit to the Russian Federation that the agreement signed between two countries was a “broad outline and nothing specific yet,” and that he has to consult his cabinet secretaries to factor in the issues on constitutionality that may arise from the possible construction of nuclear technology. “The constitution does not, would not like it. It is prohibited. That’s why, I have to talk to the government. I cannot affirm nor deny that because it is part of the proposals. The hardline would come after I shall have consulted everybody concerned, including the people of the industry affected. If it’s food, then it’s agriculture, if it’s energy, then secretary (Energy Secretary Alfonso) Cusi,” he said. He added he would particularly consult his administration’s legal team, Justice Secretary Menardo Guevarra “because if there is something in the agreement that will require the consent of congress then you have to go to Congress” to argue the executive body’s position on nuclear power. “Solar is very expensive. It is not a guarantee that it can solve our needs, that our needs can be met by this kind of arrangement. Kung kaya lang eh di matagal na natin ginawa yan (if it could, we would have done that a long time ago),” he said. He said he would decide “what is to the best interest of the country, that is the number one rule there, profit that is second, or whose favor and what company, that will come last.” The President announced that he came back from Russia with 620 million pesos in business deals signed between the two countries. “We reaffirmed Philippines’ strong commitment to robust and comprehensive partnership with the Russian Federation on the basis of mutual respect trust and pragmatism and working with Russia we have achieved much,” Duterte said. In his bilateral meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev, Duterte said they agreed to “broaden and deepen our ties in our areas of cooperation, from security and defense, to trade, and investment, agriculture, energy, science and technology, socio cultural exchanges.” “We signed bilateral cooperation agreements on the peaceful use of energy, scientific research, health, culture, and foreign policy consultations. These areas are important and therefore part of our comprehensive roadmap to build a partnership with different and to secure the Philippines strategic interest,” he said. (Antonio L. Colina IV / MindaNews)

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Isolated Ata Manobo villagers receive cash payouts for emergency employment

October 5, 2019

ASUNCION, Davao del Norte – As part of the continuous pouring of services and socioeconomic development in the recently discovered Ata Manobo village of “Sitio Tapayanon”, the Department of Labor and Employment XI conducted its first "Tulong Panghanapbuhay sa Ating Disadvantaged/Displaced Workers Program" (TUPAD/DWP) payouts for services rendered. Receiving salaries for a ten-day work amounting to P3,960.00 per worker beneficiary, the 100 residents of Sitio Tapayanon who benefitted from DOLE’s emergency employment program expressed their gratitude to the government for extending this kind of assistance to them. “This is (such) a great help. At least we have money to buy our (other) needs. Some time ago we had to wait for several months when our abaca is ready to be sold before we can earn a tenth of this money.” Datu Bansing Balanban, Tapayanon’s tribal chieftain, said in vernacular. Facilitating the payout himself was the Regional Director of DOLE XI Raymundo Agravante who, with his team from DOLE Davao del Norte Office, was transported by the Philippine Air Force’s Huey chopper in a 45-minute flight from the 10th Infantry Division to Tapayanon. “I admit it is our first time here but just the same DOLE have come, ready to give to you the services that you need. We will determine later on what else can be done to alleviate your situation and make your lives better.” Agravante told the villagers during a short welcome program. Agravante further assured the residents that DOLE will continue to contribute to the government’s agenda of inclusive growth through massive job generation and substantial poverty reduction while reducing the vulnerability to risks of the poor, vulnerable and marginalized workers. The activity highlighted the conduct of the Service Convergence Camp Heads of Agencies Ocular Visit spearheaded by the National Anti-Poverty Commission Secretary Noel Felongco. Other heads of agencies who joined the ocular visit include Kapalong Mayor Maria Theresa Timbol, Kapalong IP Mandatory Representative Datu Arturo Davao, Department of Trade and Industry Davao del Norte Provincial Director Romeo Castañaga, 1001st Infantry Brigade Commander Col. John Oberio and 60th Infantry Battalion Commander Lt. Col. Gilbert Ombos. Said agencies—together with TESDA, NCIP, DSWD, DOH, CHR, and select LGU departments and civil society organizations—are expected to deliver their counterpart services to Sitio Tapayanon on the slated Service Convergence Camp this October. Meanwhile, the second batch of TUPAD worker beneficiaries from Tapayanon will receive their payouts later this month.  

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A SOJOURNER’S VIEW: A momentous event for Mindanawon Artists

October 5, 2019

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 05 October) -- Waters.  What would Mindanao be without its waters especially the sea that surrounds the main island and its islets, the lakes (from where the name Mindanao comes from as danao or ranao or lanao refer to this body of water) and its mighty rivers that flow from watersheds in the uplands towards the cities of Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Davao, Pagadian and Cotabato. But rivers – apart from being bodies of water that serve nature and humanity in myriad ways – are powerful metaphorical images that help us conjure historical journeys as well as evoke memories that help define the interiority of our identity as a people with our own distinct cultural legacies. Comes now the First Mindanao Art Fair, Exhibit and Conferences (MAFEC or as it is referered to now, MindanaoArt). It had a grand opening at the Atrium of Gaisano Mall, Davao City on Friday, October 4. The exhibit runs for two days on October 5-6, with a confrence on Saturday – Mindanao Art Talk – at the Philippine Women’s College.  This event is centered on the theme – “Traversing the River of Creative Generations” as it “recognizes the role of the rivers abundant in the Davao region in the flourishing of life and development.” As soon as one enters the exhibit space, one reads journalist-artist Stella Estremera’s text on the exhibit’s theme relating rivers to the world of art that embraces the  whole physical, historical, ethnographic richness of Mindanao.  As the viewer walks further down the corridor, one is confronted with “The Silent Witness”  a two-panel mural done in oil that serves as the central piece of the exhibit highlighting its theme.  This is an awesome art work produced by an art collective known as Piguras Davao composed of Dominic Turno, Alfred Galvez, Rey Bollozos, Rene Pilapil, Dominic Pilapil, Bryan Cabrera, Kim Vale, Mark Tolentino, King Nelson Duyan, and Raymund Ric Bisnar. As meticulously explained by anthropologist Vinci Bueza of the Ateneo de Davao University, this panel  “measuring 6 feet  by 20 feet each, takes its inspiration from the rich history of Davao, including indigenous mythologies, popular culture, and surreal symbolisms.”  If the Davao City government is serious about putting up a grand museum inside People’s Park, they should already make sure to acquire the rights of the two-panel work so it can find a pride of place in the museum’s gallery. That would be a great way to pay homage to our local artists and make sure the generations to come have a glimpse into the uniqueness of Mindanao visual art. Conceptualized about three years ago by Kublai Millan – Davao’s distinguished sculptor-painter,  Stella Estremera and their visual artists’ group known as Lawig-Diwa, this event was meant “to pave the way in building a sustainable art industry for talented creators in the region... as well as to provide avenues to Mindanawon artists, both established and emerging, to display their works to reach and inspire diverse audiences of all ages and make Mindanao artists be recognized further into the burgeoning Philippine art scene.” As one enters the exhibit space,  one gets to see a poster of photos of the art conference speakers -- Vim Nadera,  Elba Cruz, Gerry Leonardo, Cid Reyes, Leeroy New, Dominic Rubio, Rosalie Zerrudo, Riel Hilario, Pope Dalisay, Jack Teotico and Melissa Yeung-Yap. MindanaoArt is certainly a major breakthrough for Mindanawon artists. While there have been previous attempts to bring together our local artists at various exhibits, MindanaoArt is unique as it provides a venue for Mindanawon artists’ works to interface with their counterparts from other parts of the country, while also providing a forum to discourse on the state of Philippine/Mindanawon visual art as well as build artists’ networks for mutual inspiration, encouragement and support.  One can only hope that in the coming years, there will be a second and third MindanaoArt despite the fact that organizing such a momentous event requires so much time, effort, financial resources and human labor and expertise. To view the more than a hundred art pieces representing the various visual art forms – from sculptures to paintings, photographs to art installations – one needs a full day to fully appreciate the richness of the collection put together by Lawig-Diwa and those who helped curate this exhibit. Depending on the viewers’ world view,  exposure to the whole range of art forms, interests in the field of visual arts, what they desire as collectors as well as their political stance, there are works in the exhibit that they would be attracted to. Some are much more visually attractive than others, there are those that are the quintessential art profiling the Moro and Lumad realities, in some  cases social realism interfaces with the surreal, a  cluster tapping into the rich colors of the earth and a few attempts at making political statements. A friend noted that MindanaoArt involved the works of at least 67 Mindanawon artists, 38 from Davao and 29 from Butuan, Zamboanga, Bukidnon and Cagayan de Oro. What stands out for me are a number of works. Already I mentioned the two-panel mural which combines symbolic art with the fields of history, anthropology, geology, folkloric literature and socio-economic realities of Mindanao. Another cluster that is most striking is the collection of the Talaandig Lumad artists. Using soil as their medium, they have developed an artistic technology tapping into the hues of the earth for their  paintings which encompass themes of their mythologies, indigenous beliefs, cultural legacies and discourses on Lumad cultural erosions and  ecological degradation. There is also the cluster that is perhaps the only one that has a strong political comment on Mindanao realities today.  Conceptualized and executed by Cagayan de Oro artists Nic Aca and Froilan Gallardo, this cluster is made up of blown-up photos of the Marawi Seige (by Gallardo), wood intermedia works and a video art performance (by Aca).  Froilan’s huge photo is most striking as it combines bright colors emerging out of a war-torn locale, capturing the contradictions arising out of armed conflict. Aca’s filmed art performance (mounted at an art exhibit in Bangladesh) is  a ten-minute performance that can break one’s heart. His wood intermedia  work titled “Change” is perhaps the strongest political message in this whole collection.   Feminists would easily flock to Rosalie Zerrudo’s corner with three art installations made up of embroidered images of the vagina done by women prisoners in an Iloilo jail, most of whom are incarcerated for various crimes, especially related to drugs.  While one easily thinks this is inspired by The Vagina Monologues, the three pieces in this exhibit have their own unique representations.  One has to see these to appreciate the work that have been exerted to come up with the art work. While seemingly whimsical and capricious with the use of bright colors and erotic images, a viewer can also discern the fury behind those embroidered pieces put together by Zerrudo as a statement to champion women’s concerns in a still misogynistic society. There is a cluster from Zamboanga; Kiko Miranda’s black-and-white works combining fishes and eyes are most striking. The sculptors are also a sight to see, combing pieces constituted by different materials (from wood to metal, driftwood to cement,  stonecast resin reinforced by fibreglass to glass), content (from Lumad mythologies e..g. the ever present Mebuyan to nature studies) and styles (from realistic to surreal).  There is even a sculpture-cum-art installation done by Noi Narciso who fashioned a musical instrument from all kinds of junk.  Kids – and even adults who are young-at-heart – can easily be fascinated with this art serving as a unique musical instrument. But of course the local masters of Davao who are now making waves in the art scene with collectors beginning to acquire their pieces – the likes of Kublai Milan, Anoy Catague, Madeline dela Rosa, Ronald Gaspe, Roland Delara, Waway Saway and his nephew R.J. Sumingsang, Mark Tolentino. Victor Secuya and the various painters’ groups working as collective. Part of MindanaoArt’s goal is “to build an industry so that the artists can now make more art ng hindi nagugutom” (while not being starved) and so MindanaoArt is doing its best to bring in the collectors.” One can only admire the Lawig-Diwa group for its efforts at organizing MindanaoArt. We salute them and wish them luck for more MindanaoArt productions in the coming years.  However, it will be good for the organizers to listen to the feedback of the viewers who share their passion and would like to see MindanaoArt flourish even further in the years to come.  If MindanaoArt is truly representative of the richness of Mindanawon art, it would do well to have more Lumad and Moro  artists participating.  In this first one, a Moro art perspective was hardly represented and except for the Talaandigs, same goes to the Lumad.  And it is not as if there are no Moro and Lumad artists all across the island. Perhaps part of what is needed is to expand the network of artists across Mindanao with extra effort to bring in other Lumad artists, e.g. Carlito Camahalan, a Manobo from Agusan who recently exhibited in New York. There are many others like him from among the Lumad communities. There is also need to check out from among the Tausogs, Maguindanao, Maranaws, Iranun, Kagan, Yakan and other Islamized ethnolingustic groups. The fact of the matter is that they are the first Mindanawon artists from way back the pre-conquest years and their art continues to be sustained up to now. Perhaps what is needed is to expand on the horizon of MindanaoArt to not just privilege lowland recognized artists but expand its range to accommodate what is pejoratively referred to as “folk art” but which are truly art works that have survived through a long period of time despite colonization. For after all, like the rivers of Mindanao flowing through time, the memories of our Lumad and Moro artists of their artistic legacies continue to flow into what are still produced and reproduced in their communities. And one only needs to view the richness of handwoven textiles to the weapons of the pandays to the brasswork of the musical instruments to be fully convinced that long before migrant settlers and the ensuing migrant stock produced art in Mindanao, our Moro and Lumad ancestors have produced the best of art anchored in the beauty of the earth!  [Redemptorist Brother Karl Gaspar is a professor at St. Alphonsus Theological and Mission Institute (SATMI) in Davao City and a professor of Anthropology at the Ateneo de Davao University. Gaspar is the most prolific Mindanawon book author, having written at least 22 books since 1985, including “Desperately Seeking God’s Saving Action: Yolanda Survivors’ Hope Beyond Heartbreaking Lamentations,” two books on Davao history, and “Ordinary Lives, Lived Extraordinarily – Mindanawon Profiles” launched in February 2019. He writes two columns for MindaNews, one in English (A Sojourner’s Views) and the other in Binisaya (Panaw-Lantaw)]

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Where is Mindanao art in the Philippine art scene? Visit the 1st Mindanao Art Fair and Exhibit

October 4, 2019

DAVAO CITY (MindaNews / 04 October) – “Where is Mindanao in the Philippine art scene? Is there such a thing as Mindanao art?” Visit Davao City on October 5 and 6 for the 1st Mindanao Art Fair and Exhibit (MindanaoArt) and find out the answers to these questions posed by Vim Nadera, Father of Performance Poetry and Director of the UP Institute of Creative Writing. “Traversing the River of Creativity” is the theme of MindanaoArt which will feature a main exhibit at the atrium of Gaisano Mall on October 5 and 6 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and a conference open to the public at the RSM Events Center of the Philippine Women’s College on October 5 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. There are also satellite exhibits in the city’s art galleries and a hotel in Davao City. The main exhibit will feature at least 67 artists from ten art galleries and groups – six from Davao and one each from Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Zamboanga and Bukidnon. From the exhibit notes, MindaNews counted at least 38 participating artists from Davao City and 29 from the other parts of Mindanao. Nadera, who will keynote the conference on October 5, gave a preview of his talk during the press conference Thursday afternoon. “As an outsider,” he said, he would ask “where is Mindanao in the Philippine art scene? Is there such thing as Mindanao art? As a writer, I’ll be asking where is Mindanao in Philippine literature … in Philippine dance … in Philippine music … in Philippine theatre … in Philippine film … in Philippine culinary arts? Where is Mindanao in, of course, the visual arts?” Nadera also wants to know who is a Mindanao artist. “How would you define a Mindanao artist? Should he or she be a Lumad? Should he or she be a Muslim? Or should he or she be a langyaw or a settler or a tagalabas, a migrant?” “Sila’y atong paadtuon diri” MindanaoArt is a project of Lakbay-Diwa, a Davao City-based organization promoting art and helping artists. Rey Mudjahid “Kublai” Millan, famous for his huge sculptural pieces and art installations that have become landmarks not only in Davao City but in other parts of Mindanao is its President, and Stella Estremera, former Sun.Star Davao editor in chief who continues to write a column for the paper, is its secretary/treasurer. In a pre-event video, Millan said collectors, owners of art galleries, and art patrons in Manila “would all come down to Mindanao and makit-an nila in front of their eyes na kuyaw gyud diay kaayo ning mga artists sa Mindanao. So Instead na kami ang muadto dito, sila’y atong paadtuon diri” (they will see how good these Mindanao artists are so instead of us going there, we will let them come here). Millan explained they chose the theme “Traversing the River of Creativity” because “if this is going to be the first ever Mindanao art fair, we might as well start from the very beginning … mas maganda kung balikan natin ang nakaraan bago tayo pumunta sa kung saan man tayo papunta (it’s better to go back to our past before we proceed to wherever we may want to go). We are trying to define however which way we express yung kaluluwa, yung spirit ng (the soul, the spirt of) Mindanao but we can only do that if we start from the beginning. That’s why we were encouraging galleries and artists to first back track, from the source of all source, back to the river of creativity.” Millan said it will be the first time where viewers get to see “so much Mindanao-inspired art works” that would hopefully make them “feel the collective spirit from the different inspirations coming from the different regions in Mindanao and different art groups.” “It’s so exciting to be able to see for the first time a unified Mindanao in terms of art,” he said. Mindanao art industry Estremera said Mindanao Art is the “first ever attempt to gather art groups, art galleries from all over Mindanao in an attempt to start up a movement to stimulate an art industry kasi Mindanao has a lot of artists, all kinds of artists in fact, and there’s a lot of inspiration but there is no industry to speak of that can sustain a livelihood for the artist.” At the press conference, Estremera said they look forward to an art industry in Mindanao “that is grounded on the roots of Mindanao. Di lang kumikita but kitang-kita na Mindanao siya.” MindanaoArt is supported by a grant from the National Commission on Culture and the Arts-National Committee on Art Galleries (NCCA-NCAG) under the Regional Art Fair category. Lawig-Diwa submitted a proposal and won the competitive grant in December 2018 and has applied for the staging of the second MindanaoArt in 2020. The organizers proposed the project to “provide a venue for gallery owners and art patrons to scrutinize Mindanao's best; bring art collectors to view and buy Mindanao’s best; push local gallery owners and art spaces to sustain an industry manned by local talents thru interaction with established art galleries in the national capital; be an annual gathering for learning and interacting with art industry movers who are exposed to a vibrant, self-sustaining, and profitable art scene; and stimulate a culture of knowing one’s community among the local artists and find an identity that is uniquely Mindanao.” Museums and Galleries Month MindanaoArt is part of the NCCA’s celebration of the Museum and Galleries Month with the theme “Building the Nation, One Exhibit at a Time.” The celebration, according to John Delan Robillos, head of the NCCA-NCAG, underscores the role of museums and galleries as “custodians not only of our historical past but of our future.” “We want the public to realize that these institutions are centers of our consciousness which fuel our common identity and aspirations as a nation.” Robillos said “everyone is so excited about the Mindanao Art Fair” especially since the art scene in the past was “always centered in Manila.” Father Harold Rentoria, NCCA Commissioner for Cultural Heritage recalled that in his six years at the NCCA, “naka-centralize sa Manila ang activites.” He expressed hope that the regional art fairs like MindanaoArt “will encourage not only artists malapit lang sa sentro, hindi lang sana taga-Davao but artists from different provinces in Mindanao.” He cited the T’bolis in Sultan Kudarat and others from Maguindanao and the youth who could be the future national artists. Participating artists Art galleries and art groups that are participating in MindanaoArt are Gallery Down South, Tabula Rasa Art Gallery, Bintana Art Gallery, Piguras Davao, Art Portal Gallery for Contemporary Art and Datu Bago Gallery and Café, all in Davao City; Talaandig Soil Painters from Bukidnon; Capitol University Museum of Three Cultures from Cagayan de Oro; Likha-Caraga from Butuan City; and the Zamboanga-City based Ateneo de Zamboanga Gallery of the Peninsula and the Archipelago. Davao City is in Southern Mindanao, Cagayan de Oro and Bukidnon are in Northern Mindanao, Zamboanga is in Western Mindanao and Butuan is in Caraga region.. Mindanao has 27 provinces and 33 cities spread across six regions. While many participating artists draw their inspiration from or are influenced by the cultures of the Lumads (Indigenous Peoples) and the Moro, only one Lumad group – the Talaandig soil painters from Bukidnon – is represented in MindanaoArt. There is no Moro art group. Organizers said they extended invitations across Mindanao and the participating artists had immediately confirmed their attendance. Dinky Munda of Tabula Rasa reminded those who attended the press conference that aside from the main exhibit, there are satellite exhibits at the galleries of Tabula Rasa at Felcris Centrale, Art Portal along Legaspi St., Bintana at the NCCC Victoria Mall, Datu Bago Gallery at the Davao City National High School, and Morning Light Gallery along Quirino Avenue. There is also an ongoing exhibit at the Waterfront Insular Hotel, featuring the works of Bai Hinang, an all-women’s art group of 26 women timed for Pink October, a campaign for breast cancer awareness, and another exhibit at the Mindanao Folk Arts Museum at the PWC. The duration of the “satellite exhibits” is longer, some until October 31. “We have been preparing for this event for a long, long time. This is a long time coming. For me this is the most significant exhibit we have in Mindanao,” said the 74-year old Munda. (Carolyn O. Arguillas / MindaNews) 

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