opinion

(Updated) Iya Nice is a Tagoloanon beauty inside and out

May 10, 2020

CHARLOTTE, North Carolina-- For our Mother’s Day special, please meet the Miss Tagoloan winner of 1938, who celebrated her 100th birthday last April 25th. Born in 1920, Nice Casino was 18 years old when she sat on her throne, and she looked in every way a beauty queen as Miss Tagoloan. Beauty title holders in modern times are nowhere close to how she projected her image, even with the aid of social media and YouTube. Ever since I came to know this nice lady, I kept asking myself, why is her name Nice? Her eldest daughter Dorothy Antillon said it was the family doctor who suggested the name “Nice.” At 100 years old, she still looks really nice at her age. She lives up to her name, Myrna C. Cosin said. “She is really a nice person. I know her to be generous.” A cousin,Gina Laluna Burias expressed the same sentiments about Iya Nice, saying she is “manghitagun.” Myrna remembered something about Iya Nice that I recall myself. She said she would always ask visitors if they ate already (nakakaon na ka?) when they drop by her home. This simple question brings back a thousand memories of the past, as you can see. As I’ve told so many times in my blogs and articles, I joined the local mainstream media right after I worked as a stenographer at the 6th Municipal Circuit Court of Tagoloan-Villanueva in Misamis Oriental. One time, I recalled that there was a request from Sir Oloy, the late husband of Iya Nice, to deliver transcripts to the house. It was a Saturday morning, and to be honest I had no money, so I went to their house to deliver the transcript and collect payment. Sir Oloy was not there, but the helper ushered me in and Iya Nice came out and asked me, “Nakakaon na ka?” I was hungry, so I ate the sandwich and suman (sticky rice) and drank the coffee she offered. Iya Nice was born in the town of Balacanas in Misamis Oriental before Tagoloan was divided into towns. Now, Balacanas is part of the Villanueva town. She was born to Tirso Casino Sr. and Dorotea Valdehueza, both native Tagoloanons. This mother of three witnessed two world wars,  married businessman Teodulfo “Oloy” Cosin Yap, and is grandmother to three beautiful granddaughters. As mentioned by writer Robert Fulghum in his  book  16 Things Everyone Learned in Kindergarten, afternoon or siesta naps are one of the secrets to longevity. Iya Nice is a product of this practice, along with spending time listening to favorite songs like “No Other Love.” Her memory is still sharp, as she can clearly recall scenes from the 1939 American epic historical romance Gone with the Wind. In a Facebook post of another Tagoloanon ,Jong Casino (Jong chronicles the people and events of Tagoloan through his photography) recalled that Iya Nice was a member of the town’s Tourism Council and the Puriculture Center. Dorothy remembers Nanay having a close relationship with Iya Epoy Mabulay of the Puriculture Center. Iya Nice goes to church at the 6 AM mass, which I also attend. “She has always been there for us. She inspires us in so many ways. Growing up, she was a firm disciplinarian, but she was always fair with the three of us [siblings],” Dorothy said. With three granddaughters named Aaftine Antillon, Anneliese Antillon Galeano, and Natasha Perez, Iya Nice is living the good life. I wish to visit her one day, after this COVID-19 pandemic, for information on events and people in my hometown, which I plan to publish because she still has a good memory. I am sure Consuello Sueng S. Caballero also has her fair share of memories to add to this tribute, but I went ahead to pay my own due to deadline constraints. For questions and comments, email me at susanap@yahoo.com. Also tune into my podcast/online broadcast dubbed “Barangay S” at the Facebook page of 105.5 Bay Radio Way Kurat Balingasag on Mondays and Wednesdays through Fridays every week from 7AM to 8AM Philippine time.

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HOME OFFICE

May 8, 2020

IN times of Covid-19 and ECQ or even GCQ, many of us are lucky working at home. For me it's a double-edged sword. I love to stay at my home office - on the other side, I miss my teaching and meeting people. Working at home - does this productivity come naturally, or can you learn it? For some, working from home is a gift – a remarkable opportunity to focus and be hyper-productive, all the while finding time to play with the dogs and even exercise in short pants. For others – well, the transition isn’t quite as seamless. Some find all they’ve done with their eight hours is answer two or three emails, dream about a having a drink or discover their ‘cheese hour’. It’s true, what British writer Meredith Turits said:  some people simply have dispositions and personality traits that enable them to better adjust to the new world of remote work than others. However, it’s not so black and white. You’re not necessarily destined to be good or bad at working remotely – some may just have to put in more effort than others. Procrastination is never easier than when your superior isn’t looking over your shoulder. As long as the status light on your communication app is green, it’s easy to rush to the fridge and try to get something to eat or drink, or get into a YouTube hole, with no one any the wiser. If it feels easier to procrastinate at home than in the office, it is for most: tele work is a “weak situation” with murkier expectations about behavior, says Timothy Pychyl, associate psychology professor at Carleton University in Ontario. In contrast, he points to a common situation: “In an elevator, we all typically ‘act elevator’, for example avoid eye contact with others, and keep our distance as [much as] possible …. The office is more of a strong situation with expectations for many things such as dress codes, arrival and departure times [and] time spent on or off task.” Weaker cues and lower accountability may make procrastination more likely at home. And without the strong situation of an office, it’s quite a bit easier to dismiss unpleasant tasks and meetings with not very much welcome people. . When there’s a task on your plate you don’t want to dive into, or you’re banging your head against a wall with a tech problem, you’re testing your ‘frustration tolerance’, says Pychyl. Those who have a lower frustration tolerance are much more likely to procrastinate – they’re the people who get up from their desk and find a distraction. I don't know how you my dear readers "survive" these times. Anyway, my very best wishes at the end: stay safe and healthy. +++ Email: doringklaus@gmail.com or follow me in Facebook, Twitter or Linkedin or visit my www.germanexpatinthephilippines.blogspot.com or www.klausdoringsclassicalmusic.blogspot.com.

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Public relations agencies in a crisis – or why it could pay to have paid for ads

May 7, 2020

EDITORIAL departments of most publications are often in contact with public relations agencies or public relations departments. They are a crucial part of the media landscape as they provide a service that links brands and media outlets. The role of public relations (PR) is often defined as “The professional maintenance of a favourable public image by a company or other organization or a famous person.” In many cases this is done through the dissemination of releases to the media for publication in their outlets. Depending on where you stand, some publishers don’t publish anything unless there is an ad coming with it. Others may heavily depend on the access to ready-made content in the shape of press releases. Now that I write column regularly at the Mindanao Daily, based in Cagayan de Oro in a Mindanao-wide newspaper I would write what I think can contribute to the reader’s knowledge . If there is an advertising contract in place it might mean that the item may get a bit more exposure. Surely the publisher Dante Sudaria, would have some advertisers who seem to be happy with just the ad placement without ever having editorial support. I think it is fair to say that editors would be biased in favour of those who support the media. During my 4-year stint as the General Manager of the Limketkai Luxe I would ensure that those publication who gives press coverage are included in the hotel's advertising budget since they have continuously supported the hotel in getting full press coverage. Amazingly, now people are starting to read my column and even with this time of the Enhanced Community Quarantine ( ECQ ) press releases continue to come thru my Facebook account . And almost I never even met the public relations people except they are brands have NEVER spent a single cent on advertising with the newspaper. Many of those brands behind the releases have also never had time to allow us to introduce myself . And none of the PR agencies that send out these releases have the budget or authority to place an ad to push things along. Without exception, when asked for a tiny contribution, with amazing payment terms mind you, to keep publications going during this time, there is no answer. Not one of these releases has made it out of my inbox. Now everyone is singing the same song “We need to work together to make it through this.” While this is a very agreeable notion, so far, it seems that those brands coming out with press releases don’t seem to realise that it takes two to tango. A friend of mine was musing that he would have to have a very specific message for PR professionals after the lockdown as he may not have any media outlets left to place the releases as many publications are shutting down. And then we have the releases or information coming from brands that have been supportive of media for a long time. These are the ones that may now be benefiting from their longstanding relationship with media through advertising campaigns. I don’t think anyone would turn down the request to publish something now from a business partner that has for years paid for ads. It simply pays, in times like these, to have supported the media with hard dollars and cents. It is important to have good content, but it does not pay the bills. Editors, writers and publishers I have spoken to have the same question: How come brands can spend on the PR agencies, but ‘don’t have a budget’ to place ads in the mediums that they want to use to get their message out. They want the medium to use their resources to help them make money while they are unwilling to return the favour. While the PR agencies surely won’t work for free, even in times like this, the publisher will be left with bills to pay while there is no income. It makes it clear to publishers where their loyalties have to be. Once the dust settles, the publishing community will take stock of whom they could count on for support. Publishers, editors and other media professionals will remember those who stood by them when they were most needed.

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Restlessness

May 1, 2020

Very often - sometimes too often! - the thought is back! Especially nowadays, while experiencing ECQ and staying in our own four walls. ... If we wake up in the morning (or even many times in the middle of the night), the thought is back. Sometimes, the thought will not let us sleep. The “act of thinking”, the “reflection”, the “opinion” or the “serious consideration”, no matter, how we describe it - our memory and conscience is always with us as a permanent companion.      We brood over unsettled problem. Sometimes, we bear unfair treatments, arrogance, ignorance, incompetent know-it-all-betters, and unbearable oddballs, who inexorable love to make our life a hell while living themselves a disorderly life.      We would not like to be distracted, but we’re toying with some good ideas how we could throw overboard all that “human garbage”. What will come next is a matter of conjecture.      Of course, I’ve got my ideas, but I’m not a mind reader. Too many trains of thought make us thoughtless and absent-minded -  especially in difficult and important daily life situations.      Does waiting and/or sleeping solve our problems? Or is it just again in time? Our life’s central idea should not be, that while waiting, time solves all our problems. Thoughts should intensify, condense and deepen plans follow by actions.      It’s good and helpful to carry thoughts in us all the time. Incomprehensible, or better unfinished thoughts, no matter whether positive or negative, should be slept on, before tiredness outstrips us with supersonic speed.      Sometimes, we feel that our thoughts and ideas can’t be fulfilled with life. Where the heart is willing, it will find a thousand ways; but where the heart is weak, it will find a thousands excuses. If doubts begin to take roots, we should rouse from pink-tinted idealism or wear down and annihilate nightmares and erase and wipe out such thoughts and ideas.      If our thoughts are good and have the chance to be fulfilled in action, especially if “the other side” is prepared and willing to step on to such a bridge of life, we might get a support and words of encouragement.      And, if not? No action?      Maybe it is God’s will to keep and protect us from a careless, rash, disadvantageous and uneasy action. Every new day gives us new inexhaustible possibilities to survive, to bear trials and to start a new beginning. We overlook and fail to notice many chances in lie through our sluggishness and laziness while thinking and dreaming of unequaled and unfulfilled ideas.      My dear readers: as always stay safe. +++      Email: doringklaus@gmail.com or follow me in Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter or visit www.germanexpatinthephilippines.blogspot.com or www.klausdoringsclassicalmusic.blogspot.com.

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Arabian Travel Market moved to 2021 amid COVID-19 outbreak

May 1, 2020

Arabian Travel Market, a major exhibition for the region’s travel and tourism industry, has been moved to 2021 due to concerns over the spread of the coronavirus.      The event will now be held at the World Trade Centre in Dubai after Eid celebrations next year, from May 16 to 19, organiser Reed Travel Exhibitions said on Sunday.      Arabian Travel Market was initially scheduled to be held this month but was postponed to June 28 to July 1 as the virus outbreak halted global air travel and led to lockdowns around the world.      “Many meetings took place with the Dubai World Trade Centre and we reviewed other options to organise an event in the last quarter,” Reed Travel Exhibitions said.      “However, after consultation with our key stakeholders and after listening to our industry, ultimately it became apparent that the best course of action, and with everyone’s best interests in mind, is to postpone the event to 2021.”      The four-day event attracts more than 39,000 professionals from the global travel industry and generates about $2.5 billion (Dh9.18bn) of new business.      A number of top executives from the industry were expected to speak during the event.      “Discussions took place at the highest level, both internally and externally, with the local and federal government, partners, sponsors, exhibitors and attendees who all endorsed our evaluation of the current situation and our decision to act once again, without delay,” the organiser said.      The pandemic, which has infected more than 2.3 million worldwide and killed more than 161,000 people, according to Johns Hopkins University, has derailed the global economy and brought the trade and the travel industry to a virtual standstill.      The global economy is set to contract 3 per cent this year as it slides into the deepest recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s, according to the International Monetary Fund.      Global airlines are expected to lose $314bn in passenger revenue this year, a 55 per cent drop from 2019, as the rapid spread of the virus and ensuing travel bans continue to hurt the industry, the International Air Transport Association said last week.      Its latest assessment is much higher than the organisation’s previous estimate of a $252bn loss just three weeks ago on March 24.      Reed Travel Exhibitions said it is planning to run an “ATM virtual event” from June 1 to 3, featuring webinars, live conference sessions and one-on-one meetings, among others, to help businesses connect with each other.

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Malou sews masks for family, friends, frontliners

May 1, 2020

Charlotte, North Carolina--Malou Tabada Cordery started sewing face masks on her 50th birthday last March 28 and kept at it in the past four weeks ever since the supply of face masks went down. ‘I decided to give face masks as a gift to my friends and I sew them on my day off late in the day,’ she said.      Malou, a native of Villanueva town in Misamis Oriental, works at the Atrium Health Pharmacy here for the last 13 years and to date she had sown and distributed 150 face masks. “I gave face masks in my department, family, relatives and friends, cancer patients and their families. Definitely hard work and exhausting,’ she said.      An award-winning designer, Malou gave masks to the Carolina Panthers football team at the request of Jessica Reynolds, a diehard Panthers fan who also works at the Atrium. The Atrium Health Pharmacy is also the official pharmacy for the Panthers. “I used to prepare their emergency medication kit. And now when I see my co-workers and other people I gave facemasks to, wearing what I made, it makes me feel good knowing I can help if only in a small way,’ Malou said.      Malou said she has 20 orders being paid for and she uses the money to buy more fabrics and materials for the face masks. She said while it isn’t hard to sew, it is time consuming to make the fabric strap. ‘All the fabric stores are out of elastics, so I just made strings of the same fabric for the mask,’ she said.      As a young girl, Malou played with sewing machines. She was always cutting paper or shaping banana leaves in order to create doll dresses. The first part of her youth revolved around sewing machines. Born in Trinidad town, Bohol province in the Philippines, Malou Tabada Cordery married Richard Cordery and in their 27 years of wedded bliss, they raised two lovely daughters named Genevieve and Alyson.      Malou and her family were very active in the Filipino-American Community of the Carolinas Inc. (FACC) in the past. In 2005 her husband Richard served as second vice president and In 2010 Malou herself served as the 1st Vice President of FACC.  In the 2010 FACC Gala, Malou and Richard produced a stage drama recounting the life of Philippine national hero Jose Rizal. Richard directed the play and Malou choreographed all the different Filipino Folk dances in the play.      She is a dance choreographer and participated in various events here in Charlotte with her children. In the past Malou was one of the catechist teachers at St. Mathew Catholic Church. She has been very active helping the community through fashion show fundraising events and won awards several times for her recyclable couture which had been publicized in several magazines as well.      Graduating with a degree in arts at Cagayan de Oro City’s Capitol University,  Malou took up nursing but ended up working as a narcotic technologist at Atrium Health where she was commended for being the best employee and chosen as the ambassador of her department. Soon Malou said she would be sewing masks for the Air Force in Alaska after being requested by her co-employee whose son is an airman stationed in Alaska. ‘I feel bad about them without having any facemasks so I will be sewing for them,’ Malou said.      (For questions and comments email me at susanap@yahoo.com and also keep an eye out and hit the notification button for my online broadcasts at 105.5 Bay Radio Way Kurat FM Balingasag by liking, following and sharing the station’s Facebook page)

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