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Captain Andres Bacal : Cagayan’s Forgotten War Hero

May 12, 2020

My interest in our local world war history started six years ago. But studying it with the absence of written primary sources compounded with the dying population of veterans was a hard task to do. Our local historians were silent about it perhaps because word-of-mouth and pass down stories were hard to validate without written primary sources. Yet Cagayan de Oro is blessed with so much written history. Our local heroes were properly documented starting with the arrival of the Spaniards. But after the Fil-Am War the trail suddenly turns cold. Therefore I considered World War 2 as the missing link of our local history. I grew up listening to my father's war stories. It is still vivid to me how his eyes would shine when he talked about the heroic battles of guerrilla legend like of Maj. Angeles Limena and Capt. Fidencio Laplap. These brave guerrilla leaders gave them so much hope. Their names became bywords which travelled far and wide across Mindanao. People made songs of their battles and triumphs. They were there when the defeated Filipino people needed a hero. My 16 year old father ran away from home to enlist in the guerrilla army in Alubijid, Misamis Oriental led by Maj. Limena. He fought the Japanese with few ammunition and no shoes - barefoot for 2 ½ years. They fought against all odds rather than live on bended knees, my father said. The heroics Tiano brothers, better known for a street named Tiano Brothers, was another story worth telling.   Their stories were so grand. The patriotism was meant to be told. It was a shame to let them take their stories to the graves. Somehow I always felt that there are more stories of local heroes waiting to be told. My intuition was proven right when I was given the task by the City's World War 2 & Veterans Studies Committee headed by former Congressman Tinnex Jaraula to research the actual date of Cagayan de Oro's liberation from the Japanese occupation. Fortunately, 2 years ago I was led to a website of declassified World War 2 documents. The drought finally ended and I found myself flooded with declassified documents - all primary sources. I felt like kid in a candy store. Declassified records show that Cagayan was liberated on May 12, 1945, after a four day general offensive against 650 Japanese troops. My intuition for Cagayan’s forgotten hero was proven true. The research led to the discovery of another Kagay-anon hero. In the History of Mindanao Guerrillas compiled by 10th Military District, Capt. Andres Bacall, a Kagay-anon from Carmen, was cited in the battle report for his prominent role in the liberation of Cagayan. Capt. Andres Bacall was the commanding officer of 1st Battalion, 109th Regiment, 109th Division based in Talakag, Bukidnon. His regiment was assigned to lead the frontal attack against 650 well- entrenched Japanese troops. 120th regiment of 108th Division from Iligan covered the left flank while the 111th Regiment of 109th Division supported the right flank. When lead element of Capt Bacall’s 109th regiment started the general offensive, they encountered slight resistance at Dipnoan but the Japanese put up a stiff and almost fanatical defense at Dipnoan Bridge when reinforcements of 100 Japanese soldiers arrived. But after an hour of heavy fighting the 1st Battalion commanded by Capt. Bacall was able to capture Patag Airstrip. The rest of the troops were able to reach the west side of Cagayan River on the same day. The three regiments of all Filipino guerrilla troops were able to liberate and occupy Cagayan after four days of fighting. Inspired by the heroic story of another Kagay-anon, I dug a little deeper. I wanted to know more about our latest uncovered local hero. Thru my network of Kagay-anon friends I contacted Dr. Eric Bacal. He told me Capt. Bacal was an older brother of his father but died before he was born. Dr. Bacal said Capt. Bacal has a son now living in Cebu. In a long distance call, William Bacal told me his father died of stroke in 1965. He was 48 years old. At the time of his death, they were living in Manilla where father worked for the government. Col. Adecer of the Phil. Air Force, also a Kagay-anon, was his father's best friend and classmate in Flying School. He brought them and the body of his father to Cagayan de Oro in a C-47 plane for the wake and burial. He was the 4th child in the brood of 10 by Mariano Bacal and Aquilina Daba Bacal. Before the war he married Portia Chaves, the daughter of Roque Chaves of Cagayan. William is the second of five children. William said his father was a graduate of flying school in Manila and was inducted into USAFFE. Before the surrender of the Philippines, Capt Andres Bacal came home to Cagayan in a PT boat as one of the escorts of General Douglas MacArthur in his famous Breakout from Corregidor, William added. But that's another story.     

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Guerrilla Submarines in Northern Mindanao during World War II

May 12, 2020

(We are bringing back this story in commemoration of the 75th Anniversary of the Liberation of Cagayan, Misamis (now Cagayan de Oro) from the Japanese during World War II.)  During World War II, US Navy submarines helped supply Filipino and American guerrillas with arms, ammunition and supplies, also ferrying personnel in and out of the islands. Known as the SPYRON (for Spy Squadron) Operation, it supported the Filipino and American Guerrillas resistance to the Japanese occupation after the Philippines fell to the Japanese Imperial Forces in early 1942. The Spyron operation was key to the success of the resistance. Without the arms and supplies ferried by US submarines, the guerrillas would have been unable to sustain their intelligence gathering and sabotage operations against the Japanese forces. Even before Corregidor surrendered, submarines were already playing a key role in the Battle for the Philippines supplying arms and ammunition to the beleaguered island, and ferrying people in and out the war zone. The Quezon Mission Notable among these missions was the USS Swordfish (SS-193) under Lt. Cmdr. C.C. Smith which picked up President Manuel L. Quezon, his wife, two daughters, and son; Vice President Sergio Osmeña Sr.; Chief Justice Jose Abad Santos; and Philippine Army officers General Valdes, Colonel Nieto, and Chaplain Captain Ortiz from Corregidor on February 19, 1942.  Swordfish then departed via a safety lane through the minefield in the harbor and headed for San Jose on Panay Island, where she arrived on February 22nd, and transferred President Quezon and his party to a motor tender. Quezon and his family proceeded to Iloilo and were ferried to Oroquieta, Misamis Occidental by PT-41 of MTB Ron 3 skippered by Lt. John Bulkeley, who would later successfully transfer General Douglas MacArthur, his family and staff from Corregidor in their famous “Breakout” to Australia via Cagayan, Misamis and Bukidnon on March 11-13, 1942. Hence, they motored to Del Monte Airfield in Bukidnon where they were subsequently flown to Australia by B-17. (Source: John Clear's collection of more than 63,000 pages of U. S. submarine World War II patrol reports, compiled from original U. S. Government microfilms. Chick Parsons The man responsible for the SPYRON operations was U.S. Naval Commander Charles Parsons, Jr.  Better known by his nickname “Chick”, Parsons first came to Manila when he was five years old. When World War II broke out, he and his family managed to return to the USA under a diplomatic exchange. However, Chick volunteered to return to the Philippines  to organize secret submarine missions in support of the Philippine Guerrilla movement. His extensive knowledge of the country and his network of local contacts enabled him to communicate effectively with the guerrilla units. "Chick" initially worked out of the Allied Intelligence Bureau (AIB), and later moved to the Philippine Regional Section, but his own inner group which he commanded was known as "SPYRON" and was a very independent bunch of characters. Parsons' Navy boss was Capt. Arthur McCollum. SPYRON was essentially a warehousing operation used to accumulate equipment to be sent up by submarine to the Guerrillas in the Philippines. "Chick" worked in Heindorff House at 171 Queen Street, and lived in Lennon's Hotel in George Street in Brisbane. Capt. McCollum reported to Admiral James Fife. While this was his official chain of command Parsons also reported to Courtney Whitney, Lt. Gen. Richard Sutherland and General Douglas MacArthur / Parsons had joined MacArthur in January 1943. He convinced the Navy that if they lent MacArthur "Special Mission" submarines, the guerrillas would establish coast watcher radio stations throughout the islands which would supply numerous targets for their submarines.  Parsons sailed to the Philippines on eight occasions on board a submarine to supply Filipino guerrillas in enemy occupied Mindanao. Amongst the submarines used for these missions were USS Narwhal and USS Nautilus, the two biggest submarines in the US Navy at the time each of which could carry up to 100 tons of supplies compared to 30 tons for the usual fleet submarines. By 1944, his notoriety had grown so much Japanese authorities in Tokyo offered a "$50,000 Dead or Alive" reward for Parsons.  But the effect of the Spyron missions to the guerrillas and civil populace was electric. “The effect upon the guerrillas (also upon the civilians) was miraculous,” Parsons wrote in a letter to the Philippine president-in-exile, Manuel L. Quezón. “It was touching to observe the gratitude of the men for the supplies. It showed them they were not abandoned, that their efforts were known to and appreciated by General MacArthur—it gave them new life.” According to Captain Bobb Glenn, Chief Supply Officer for the AIB who was deeply involved in supplying the  guerrillas in the Philippines, once Col. Courtney Whitney (Sectional Officer, AIB) arrived in GHQ, the AIB was more or less out of the picture as the Philippine Regional Section was more favored by MacArthur for his special missions and the Philippine resupply effort. (source: https://www.ozatwar.com/sigint/prs.htm) Spyron in Northern Mindanao The first Spyron operation in Northern Mindanao and seventh Spyron mission overall,  involved the Bowfin (SS-287) under Cmdr. J. H. Willingham on Sept. 3, 1943 when it embarked nine persons and  delivered seven tons of radio equipment and supplies at Iligan Bay, 1 ¼ mile east of Binuni Point (off present day Bacolod, Lanao del Norte). Four weeks later on Sept. 29, 1943, at the same location, Bowfin evacuated nine guerrillas, selected by their superior officers, to be transported to Australia. Among them were Luis Morgan, executive officer of Col. Wendell Fertig, who headed the organized Filipino-American Resistance in Mindanao ; Edward M. Kuder, a well-known superintendent of schools in Mindanao and Samuel C. Grashio, a U.S. Army Air Corps fighter pilot prior to his capture on Bataan. Grashio had survived the infamous 'Death March' to be confined in three different Japanese prison camps before finally escaping from the Davao Penal Colony with a group of 10 POWs and two Philippine convicts and then joining the guerrillas. The Narwhal cometh But perhaps the most famous submarine to figure in Spyron operations in Northern Mindanao was the USS Narwhal (SS-167), the lead ship of her class of submarine and one of the "V-boats", the second ship of the United States Navy to be named for the narwhal. She was named V-5 (SC-1) when her keel was laid down on 10 May 1927 by the Portsmouth Navy Yard in Kittery, Maine. At 371 feet long and with a displacement of 4,000 tons submerged, Narwhal was one of the biggest US Navy submarines during WW2, but was not really suited for attack, thus was assigned to transport supplies and personnel to guerrillas in the Philippines especially, eventually became the leading submarine in supporting the Philippine guerrillas with nine secret transport missions to her credit, five of which were conducted in the Caraga and Northern Mindanao regions.  First Mission to Nasipit On her seventh war patrol and ninth Spyron mission, Narwhal skippered by Lt. Cmdr. Frank D. Latta, entered Butuan Bay submerged at 0508 hrs on November 15, 1943. At 1605 hours, she sighted a launch flying the proper security signal. She surfaced and Colonel Wendell W. Fertig, commander of the United States Forces in the Philippines (USFIP) and head of the organized resistance in Mindanao, came aboard. Narwhal then proceeded to Nasipit Harbor. On her way in she ran aground on hard sand in the channel's west bank, but managed to free herself quickly. At 1746 hours, Narwhal moored starboard side at the Nasipit dock as a Filipino band played “Anchors Away.” At 2330 hours, she completed offloading 46 tons of supplies. Early the next day, she embarked 32 evacuees, including POW escapees Shofner, Hawkins and Dobervich, women, two children, and one baby, and got underway. Spyron Operations Chief Lt. Cmdr. Chick Parsons left Narwhal with the harbor pilot. Remarks the Narwhal's patrol report: "The very real need for any kind of stores in guerrilla occupied areas led us to transfer considerably more stores than were actually consigned as cargo. Additional arms and ammunition as well as foodstuffs were transferred to Col. [Wendell] Fertig. An eyewitness account of this story is told in the book “My Faraway Home” by Mary Mackay Maynard, who was one of the two children evacuated. It is also related in John Keat’s book “They Fought Alone” which relates the guerrilla war in Mindanao under Fertig who was on hand to meet the submarine.  Seventeen days later, on Dec. 2, 1943,  Narwhal entered Butuan Bay and surfaced at 1706 hours, some 1,000 yards off Cabadbaran. Shortly thereafter, a 150-ton barge came alongside. Fertig and Parsons came aboard.  Narwhal embarked seven evacuees - two soldiers, three civilian men, one woman, and one eight-year-old girl. She unloaded 92 tons of supplies, 300 gallons of lube oil, a small amount of hand tools, received three messages regarding the next phase of her mission, and used the portable radio station on the barge to send three messages. At 2205 hours, she got underway with Parsons aboard.   The Alubijid Mission  Narwhal then proceeded to Alubijid, Misamis Oriental on December 5, 1943 to pick up nine evacuees. The ship’s log dated December 5, 1943 War Patrol No. 8 Alubijid (a microfilm of the actual entry in the ship’s log) shows details of its rendezvous:  0148 hours, she sighted the proper security signal at Alubijid, Majacalar Bay. 2nd Lt Noble, PA, came aboard to verify Narwhal was there to embark evacuees, then returned to shore. One boat load came alongside carrying the DeVries family. Other boats followed sometime later.  Relatives of the Filipino guerrillas and residents who helped unload Narwhal recalled the tales told to them by their forebears of that memorable event. Frank Galarrita relates how one of the teams that unloaded arms from the sub were his two grandfathers, the father of Virgilio Galarrita, and  Ismael Labis, the Vice Mayor of Alubijid at that time, who was accompanied by his two teen-aged daughters. “I think Lt. Noble was from Cebu,” he recalls. “They pronounced Noble as Noob-lee not in English as Noobol.” “My aunt told me that they brought the precious goods to Barangay Lourdes, thereafter, probably some went to Bukidnon. But Barangay Lourdes at that time was still a town of Bukidnon,.” “So that was the name of the submarine that quietly docked in Moog to unload supplies for the Filipino guerillas,” recalls Virgilio Galarrita. “My father was one of those civilians recruited to carry all kinds of supplies from the sub.” “He said there were all kinds and sizes of boxes to be carried. He said he regretted to have volunteered to carry a small box not knowing that it was heavy since it was one of the ammo boxes. He said he should have picked one of those big wooden boxes carried by two people and happened to be lighter since they were boxes of biscuits and cookies.” “After that there were stories that went around that some of those volunteers ate some of those biscuits and cookies, others took some home to their families, after they cracked open the box. Mga abtik gyud kining uban nga mga Alubijidnon!” “My grandfather Manuel Gapuz was one of them, I think,” said Manuel Abellanosa. “They used a gas lantern (known locally as Petromax) covered with a big tin can (taro) with a hole to communicate with the submarine at night via Morse Code. Supplies, guns and ammo were carried through a "back trail" up to Bukidnon. They would pass by Lunsi where Lola Doding, Mommy Ellen, Uncle Fred evacuated.” Former Misamis Oriental Board Member Cromwell Galarrita Generalao shared his stories: “The US submarine that docked in Moog, Alubijid in 1943 was among the many popular stories of the war in Alubijid. Unfortunately we have no documents, letters or records of the event. My father, Arturo Jamis Generalao, tirelessly and fondly told stories of the war, among which was a US submarine that docked in Moog.” “The US submarine brought modern firearms and supplies for the Philippine Army and the local guerrillas. My father recalled that one evening, while at Guinotang, Alubijid, about 2 kilometers from the Poblacion where his family had a small farm, he noticed that some guerrillas, many of them his relatives, were walking briskly towards the Poblacion, Alubijid.” “The guerrillas commandeered some carabaos. As a curious teenager and fascinated by the actions of war, he followed the guerrillas. On their way, he heard the guerrillas talking about receiving modern firearms from a US ship at Moog.” “When he heard of a US ship at Moog, my father said he was very excited to follow the guerrillas, with the intention of boarding the US ship and go to the US. From Poblacion, the troops proceeded towards, Lanao, Molocboloc and finally Moog.” “At Moog shore, he saw Philippine Army soldiers on the shore. He thought they were from the Philippine Army Camp at Kalabaylabay, El Salvador. The Army soldiers had a Petromax.” “My father said he was so amazed at the sight of the US submarine that looked different from a ship. He tried to join the line of the guerrillas, pretending to help carry the firearms and supplies to shore, but actually intended to board the submarine and stow away. But the US sailors only allowed Filipino Army soldiers to board the submarine to haul the firearms and supplies.” “The guerrillas stayed at the shore to receive the firearms and supplies and tied them to the carabaos. The firearms and supplies loaded on the carabaos were brought towards Lourdes, Alubijid.” “The sight of the submarine for the first time and the new modern firearms with lots of ammunition fascinated my father, Philippine Army soldiers and the guerrillas. He identified the firearms as: Garand Rifles, Thompson Submachine guns, M-1 Carbine Rifles, and Browning Automatic Rifles.” Narwhal embarked two men, three women, and four children then stood out of Majacalar Bay at 0446 hours. Back to Cabadbaran On March 3, 1944 Narwhal was back in Cabadbaran to deliver 70 tons of supplies but had to abort the mission when 3 IJN destroyers approached. She was able to meet with Capt. Hamner and pick up 9 evacuees including Hamner.  At 1000 hours, on March 2nd, the proper security signal was spotted on the beach at Cabadbaran. She surfaced and a boat came alongside. Three representatives of Fertig came aboard. They said Fertig was waiting at the Agusan River mouth because it was too difficult to tow their barge into the bay. Latta brought Narwhal as near to the river shoal as he dared and then laid to.  Narwhal's crew began rigging their two launches topside for delivery to Fertig. Fertig came aboard and asked Latta to move up the channel to the barge and to delay unloading until the next day. But Latta refused both requests. Instead, he sent one of Narwhal's launches to have the barge towed alongside. By 0210 hours on March 3rd, seventy tons of cargo was unloaded and two 26-foot whale boats were delivered to Fertig. Narwhal also embarked twenty service men and eight civilians, including two women. At 0229 hours, Narwhal stood out of Butuan Bay. Last Mission to Balingasag On Sept 27, 1944 Narwhal was back under Cmdr. Jack C. Titus (who took command starting with her 11th War Patrol) in Northern Mindanao, to deliver 3 men and 20 tons of supplies to Balingasag, Misamis Oriental, This later proved to be the last Spyron mission to Northern Mindanao.  Narwhal surfaced on the night of Sept. 27, 1944 and sighted the proper signal from the shore of Balingasag. Some 45 minutes later, a heavy rain obscured all land and at 1744 hrs a small boat with a US Ensign was sighted. All cargo was unloaded by 2100 in spite of the bad weather and at 2103, Narwhal commenced clearing the coast.   By Sept. 28 she left the Mindanao Sea for Siari Bay where she embarked 31 liberated POWS. The prisoners had been aboard Japanese transports sunk by Paddle (SS-263) off Sindagan Point on September 6.  In October 20, 1944 MacArthur fulfilled his vow to return to the Philippines with the invasion of Leyte and mopping up operations of isolated pockets of Japanese resistance started on April 17, 1945  The last Spyron mission was conducted by Nautilus on January 3, 1945 at Baculin Bay, Davao Oriental, to offload 45 tons of supplies which were received by 2nd Lt. N. Artero in behalf of Fertig.  On August 15, 1945 Japan surrendered to the Allied forces in Tokyo Bay. (Photos courtesy of ozatwar.com & MacArthur Memorial)   Map of Iligan Bay showing Binuni Point off Bacolod, present day Lanao del Norte (courtesy of Nole C. Nusog) Cmdr. Chick Parsons during a mission in the Philippines stands beside a typical guerrilla hut in his typical outfit for getting around in the jungle. He often used sneakers  to be able to run fast when needed as he was a champion miler in high school in Tennessee and never carried a weapon. (photo: ozatwar.com)    

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US Congressional Gold Medal Awardees 10th Military District, US Forces in the Philippines (USFIP)

May 12, 2020

In accordance with Public Law 114-265, the Filipino Veterans of World War II Congressional Gold Medal was awarded by US Director for Veterans Affairs, US Embassy, Manila Tracey A. Betts assisted by Defense Secretary Delfin N. Lorenzana last November 27, 2018 during the PHIVDEC Veterans’Day Event 2018 held at the Limketkai Mall Atrium, Cagayan de Oro City. As Cagayan de Oro commemorates the 75th Anniversary of its Liberation from Imperial Japan, the Phividec Industries Association salutes the following awardees who played that part in attaining this ultimate victory. MABUHAY! •    Private First Class Rito M. Caracot - Combat Company, 105thInfantry Regiment, 10th Military District and Headquarters Service Company, 3rd Infantry Battalion, 62nd Infantry Regiment, 6th Military District, US Forces in the Philippines     Served September 16, 1942 to December 3, 1945 with the Combat Company, 105thInfantry Regiment, and 10th Military District Infantry. Assigned in the area of Lanao from Kolambugan that harassed the enemy and provided intelligence to the allied liberation forces. He became part of the Headquarters Service Company, 3rd Infantry Battalion, 62nd Infantry Regiment, 6th Military District.  •    Private Claudio E. Flores - “K” Company, 3rd Battalion, 41st Infantry     Served July 15, 1944 to June 10, 1945, Pvt. Flores rendered wartime military service under the “K” Company, 3rd Battalion, 41st Infantry which fought fiercely against the Japanese forces in Mindanao, particularly in Misamis Oriental, Zamboanga and Davao.  •    Private Hilarion R. Abarca - “H” Company, 2nd Battalion, 120th Infantry Regiment, Philippine Army     Served December 16, 1942 to May 21, 1945 with “H” Company, 2nd Battalion, 120th Infantry Regiment, Philippine Army. The unit conducted combat operations in Lugait, Initao, Misamis Oriental and adjoining provinces in Mindanao, inflicting serious damage to the enemies which led to their eventual surrender. His unit was later attached to the 8th US Army at Manticao, Initao, Misamis Oriental.  •    Corporal Nicasio V. Magno - Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 1st Battalion, 113th Infantry Regiment, US Forces in the Philippines (USFIP)     Served February 1, 1944 to October 1, 1945, under the Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 1st Battalion, 113th Infantry Regiment. First joined the guerillas under the Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 113th Infantry Regiment and assigned to the Battalion S-2 and S-3 as draftsman and made sketches of maps. Subsequently, his unit was attached to the 8th US Army and later transferred to Headquarters and Headquarters Service Company, 1st Battalion, 113th Infantry Regiment; his unit served as guard and participated in enemy actions at Nasipit and Amparo in the province of Agusan del Norte.  •    Private Federico S. Beniag - “I” Company, 3rd Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment. US Forces in the Philippines     Served August 1, 1943 to July 31, 1945, with “I” Company, 3rd Battalion, 110th Infantry Regiment. His unit conducted many combat and mopping up operations against the enemy forces and helped in liberating several coastal towns in Misamis Oriental and Bukidnon.  •    Private Sulpicio N. Cabasan - “B” Company, 109th Division, 10th Military District, US Forces in the Philippines (USFIP)     Served November 23, 1942 to September 26, 1945, with “B” Company, 109th Division, 10th Military District. He served in various combat operations against the Japanese occupation forces in Lanao and adjoining provinces in Mindanao. Their unit inflicted heavy damage to the enemy’s facilities and equipment and caused many enemy casualties which led to their eventual surrender.  •    Corporal Pastor M. Tanguamos - Signal Company, 105th Division, 10th Military District, US Forces in the Philippines (USFIP)     Served April 8, 1943 to July 3, 1948, under the Signal Company, 105th Division, 10th Military District. His unit operated in Lopez Jaena, Oroquieta, Misamis Oriental, Kolambugan and adjacent towns and was responsible for intercepting enemy communications that contributed to the eventual defeat of the Japanese forces.  •    Sergeant Aquilino N. Caldoza - “A” Company, 1stBattalion, 104thInfantry Regiment and 87th Military Police Company, Philippine Army     Served December 8, 1941 to January 23, 1947 under the “A” Company, 1st Battalion, 104th Infantry Regiment. His unit conducted combat operations against the Japanese occupation forces and Filipino collaborators in Mindanao. He later served under 87th Military Police Company, Philippine Army, that was responsible for cooperating with the civil authorities on plans including those for police protection, blackouts, and anti-sabotage activities in the area of Misamis Oriental, Lugait, Bukidnon and nearby towns.   •    Private Martiniano R. Quidet - 101st Engineer Battalion, 101st Division, Philippine Army,     United States Army Forces in the Far East (USAFFE)      Served October 22, 1941 to January 23, 1946, with the 101st Engineer Battalion, 101st Division, Philippine Army (USAFFE). His unit provided construction and combat engineering support to other guerilla forces that operated in Bukidnon, Misamis Oriental and Lanao.  •    Maj. Fidencio M. Laplap (Ret) - “B” Company, 81st Eng. Battalion, 81st Division, USAFFE and 109th Infantry Regiment, 109th Infantry Division, 10th Military District, US Forces in the Philippines (USFIP)     Served August 28, 1941 to April 30, 1946. Col. Laplap started as a trainee under the Field Artillery, Philippine Army. He was commissioned 3ld Lieutenant on August 28, 1941 and was inducted into the USAFFE on December 8, 1941 at Camp Overton, Iligan City and assigned to the “B” Company, 81st Eng. Battalion, 81st Division as executive officer. When the regular forces in Mindanao were disbanded, he refused to surrender and organized the 109th Infantry Regiment, 109th Infantry Division, 10th Military District. He led his unit in numerous tactical, combat and extensive mopping up operations against the enemy forces in Cagayan and other parts of Misamis Oriental.      For his gallantry in action, Colonel Laplap was awarded the US “Silver Star Medal” in December 1945 and the “Gold Cross Medal” by the Philippine Anny in the same month.       The Silver Star Medal, is the United States Armed Forces 3rd-highest personal decoration for valor in combat. It is awarded primarily to members of the United States Armed Forces for gallantry in action against an enemy of the United States. •    3Lt Trifon V. Judith - Philippine Constabulary and 1st Replacement Company, 5th Replacement Battalion     Served April 20, 1942 to May 23, 1945, under the Philippine Constabulary that maintained peace, law and order in Oroquieta, Lugait, Bukidnon, Misamis Oriental and adjacent towns. After the disbandment of the regular forces, he joined the 1st Replacement Company, 5th Replacement Battalion. His unit was tasked in augmentation and replacement of their fellow guerrillas who were killed or wounded during combat operations in various areas in Mindanao.

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It's time to shine for Joshua Alforque Calderon

May 5, 2020

IT'S TIME TO SHINE! SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE: LAST OF 3 PARTS BY JOEL CALAMBA ESCOL, MDN night editor and Lead SEO    AFTER DECADES of training about motivations, the art of selling and the art of leveraging, our main man Joshua Alforque Calderon has finally decided it's time for him to shine. So, he put up his own company in the multi-level marketing industry sometime in June of 2019 and created a team that could easily multiply his ultimate drive for success. "Atong nahuna-hunaan no nga panahon na para kita napud ang motukod sa kaugalingon natong kompanya. Ug multi-level man ang atong nakita mga dako ug makatabang kanato tungod sa atong mga experiences sa ubang company, nag decide dayun kita nga tukuron ang Jocals688," Joshua narrated. He said "sa sulod lang sa pipila bulan nahimong nationwide ang atong kompanya tungod sa atong aggressive campaigns sa ubang mga lugar sa Pilipinas." BEAUTY & WELLNESS PRODUCTS (watch video below)   BRANCH OPENINGS NATIONWIDE   GOING INTERNATIONAL Now that Jocals688 has already started invading the foreign land with the successful establishment of Papua New Guinea and the US Market, he revealed by 2020 and beyond, his company will be known globally, as they will bring the Filipino beauty and wellness products into the world market. "Excited na kita nga mahuman na kining problema sa covid aron molarga kita sa Manila para i-kompleto ang requirements nato sa Securities and Exchange Commission," Mr Calderon said. Calderon said his company is going to penetrate the world market especially in the United States, Asia Africa and Europe. COPING WITH CHALLENGES Jocals688 is currently facing a challenge as the Securities and Exchange Commission has given an advisory that their products and business format needed more papers from SEC as well as from the Bureau of Food and Drugs. But Joshua Calderon is quick to answer they have complete papers and will comply all the requirements asked by the SEC, if it means protecting them from harassments made by competitors. Over a local radio station Magnum Radio, Calderon explained there is nothing to worry as the company is going to comply all the requirements.        "Ang atong lawyer kamulo nag prepare sa atong pagdala sa mga dugang papeles ngadto sa SEC tungod kay gusto gyud pud nato nga legal gyud kitang mag operate," he said.  LEGAL DOCUMENTS Calderon furnished MDN copies of some legal papers of the company that would verify their intention of operating legally. Some of which were business permits from other branches of Jocals688 nationwide. They also have SEC registration, DTI registration, BIR, BFAD application, among others. "Andam kitang mosunod sa mga requirements kay gusto nato nga molangtud pa sa singkwenta ka tuig ug hangtud nga ang ato nang mga kabataan mao nay mopadayun sa maong negosyo, the very determined future MLM mogul said.  

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Good samaritan Joshua Calderon reveals more corporate social responsibility efforts

May 3, 2020

'HIS DISCOVERED HIS ONLY WAY OUT TO ESCAPE MASSIVE POVERTY'   SHARING HIS FORTUNES TO THE LESS IN LIFE. Joshua Calderon, a very successful  businessman now shares his fortunes with other Filipinos who have less in life. In doing so, he also receives more blessings and abundance from the Lord. His beauty and wellness business is now nationwide and going to invade the international market soon.   SPECIAL NEWS FEATURE: 2nd of three parts BY JOEL CALAMBA ESCOL, MDN night editor Remember the good samaritan Joshua Calderon? I had a grand time conducting an exclusive interview with Joshua the other day and he revealed to me that he has been a giver ever since before and he wants to nurture in his mind the art of giving. He said as a businessman and entrepreneur, who was been very successful, he wants to give back his fortune with the less fortunate in life. "Naagian na nato ang kinabuhing pobre busa kabalo kita unsa ka lisod kining maong parte sa kinabuhi sa tawo sa dihang didto pa kita nanimuyo sa Molave, Zamboanga del Sur, pipila ka dekada na ang milabay," he remembered. Joshua revealed that he also helped a member of the Road and Traffic Administration personnel who was shot dead while on duty in Barangay Puerto last month. Read related story below. TRAFFIC ENFORCER SHOT DEAD IN CAG DE ORO   "I have pledged to Magnum Radio that I am going to help the RTA man's immediate family for P10K every month for one year and it's been ongoing now." He said that with the start of the pandemic he has also helped the blind masseurs in Barangay 40 for rice and some cash. The good samaritan also donated to eight hospitals for their need for PPEs and other protective gears as frontliners - to continue the fight against the unseen attack of deadly coronavirus disease. LOVELY. Businessman Joshua Calderon and his better half always bind together. "In every success of a man there is always a woman."   LEVERAGE. Businessman Joshua Calderon knew very well that in his industry, leveraging is the most important aspect. If you leverage your business by presenting to more people, you are on the right track to achieve more income.   SNACKS FOR THE FRONTLINERS. Joshua's team give snacks to frontliners to kee them moving from their mission to fight against covid19.     RUGS TO RICHES STORY The new man of the masses admitted to us that he was also a struggling and a very poor man in Molave, Zamboanga but he worked hard for his dream. He was a 'trike' driver. He has also lived the life of a 'trike' driver who ferried passengers to their places of destinations and his life was on the streets everyday under the heat of the sun. Joshua's father was also a tricycle driver and their very poor situation, whose daily subsistence was only derived from the income of ferrying passengers, Joshua only finished high school. "So kanunay nakong gihunahuna ang kalampusan ni Manny Pacquiao nga bisan wala siya makahuman sa high school kaniadto apan ginamit ang iyang abilidad sa boksing ug ang kataas sa iyang pangandoy, nakab-ot gihapon nya ang kalampusan," he narrated. JOSHUA'S ONLY WAY OUT FROM POVERTY Armed with his ultimate dreams and guts, Joshua joined a multi-level marketing company known as First Quadrant decades ago and all other companies of the same concept of marketing thereafter - and from there, he trained very hard, digesting all the strategies of this revolutionary type of selling. His last MLM company was Aim Global, in which he also digested all the trainings, ranging from the art of selling, presenting, motivations and other related knowledge he could digest in order to become a successful businessman. "After those companies that I joined, I realized that my only way out from the bondage of poverty was thru MLM because I have no enough capital to start a traditional business," he pointed out. TO BE CONTINUED ON THE LAST PART...    

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Much-needed “survival packs” reach T’boli weaving community

April 22, 2020

Lake Sebu, South Cotabato - “Over and over, again and again, God is faithful in the lives of the weavers.” These are the words shared by Ms. Jenita Eko president of the Lake Sebu Indigenous Women Weavers Association, Inc. (LASIWWAI), as 170 households from an indigenous T’boli community received food and other essential items from Ayala Foundation and other organizations. Ayala Foundation provided 25 sacks of rice for distribution among LASIWWAI volun-teers, cultural masters, weavers, and affiliate weavers. In the past year, Ayala Founda-tion has been working with the members of the LASIWWAI, many of whom have been keeping the beautiful tradition of t’nalak weaving alive. The rice assistance is part of Ayala Foundation’s efforts to continue supporting its partner communities, as the country continues to experience challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.  While the foundation provided rice for T’boli families, members of the community have shown their solidarity and compassion for one another, through the sharing of re-sources. Community members volunteered to assemble the assistance packages, which they called “survival packs,” as these are much-needed by the community “to surpass the crisis”. And as their way of helping their neighbors and loved ones survive this challenge, farmers from the community shared part of their harvest of vegetables to complete the survival packs.  Even during challenging times, the weavers remain true to her culture. Eko shared that during the relief distribution, one of the recipients was seen transferring some of the essential goods she had received into her malong, which she assembled into a klofoy. Klofoy is a way of assembling the malong to help a T’boli woman safely and comfortably carry goods and other objects that she picks up while on transit.  “The convergence of resources is a great help to deliver enough supplies for LASIWWAI weavers and to reach out non-member t’nalak weavers,” said Eko. “Thank you for sharing your blessings with the T’boli tribe in Lake Sebu.” LASIWWAI is a not-for-profit, community-based organization that promotes weaving “not only as a source of livelihood for indigenous women, but also as an integral part of their indigenous culture…. It seeks to empower women by working on two top priority programs: peace and multiculturalism, and poverty reduction.” As an advocate of community development through inclusion and inspiration, Ayala Foundation has been working with LASIWWAI on various initiatives that empower the indigenous community while also promoting sustainable livelihood.  About Ayala Foundation As the social development arm of the Ayala group of companies, Ayala Foundation en-visions communities where people are creative, productive, self-reliant, and proud to be Filipino. Ayala Foundation's main program areas are Education, Community Leadership, Suitable and Sustainable Livelihood, and Arts and Culture. For more information, visit www.ayalafoundation.org    

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